Sunday retailing and religious festivals

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Cast your minds back to the Summer – the Olympics were about to happen, the weather was appalling and we were given longer opening hours on Sundays for the larger stores. The reasoning? To allow all the visitors to the Olympics to shop ‘normally’ on a Sunday.

20121223-125234.jpgIt doesn’t appear to have had much of an effect on the big stores figures, and from what they reported they weren’t actually that bothered with longer hours! But it was allowed for a sporting event.

Roll forward six months and there is a bit of a religious festival about to occur (Christmas for those who don’t know) – and Sunday was the penultimate day for shopping. It was therefore rather busy especially in the supermarkets. Marks and Spencer’s in West Bridgford being a classic example with people queuing around the store for the tills (and having to wait to even get into the store!) the reason for this? Sunday trading laws, normally M&S could spread the rush over at least 12 hours rather than 5!

So my question is – why if we can change the Sunday trading laws (in place for religious reasons allegedly) for a sporting event (non religious) why can’t we change them for a religious festival?

Is it me or is there something not quite right here!

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One thought on “Sunday retailing and religious festivals

    Adrian said:
    December 24, 2012 at 10:21 am

    I agree entirely. I’ve always had the opinion that Sunday trading laws should be abolished or heavily revised. In some cases they prevent people from working who want to work. Ridiculous really.

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